Zen Not Zen

On my day off, I was browsing the Internet and came across yet another nonsensical use of the word “Zen” to adorn a programming project. This isn’t the first time I’ve seen this in the wild. A quick search of GitHub shows an undeniable pattern.1 Even GitHub itself is complicit.

A quick glance at some of the (sometimes grating) descriptions and documentation for these projects reveals the use of “Zen” to connote simplicity, ease, and minimalism. Especially minimalism. I think the idea is to evoke harmony—with nature, with the user, with the computer, or with whatever—and peace, inasmuch as that can come from a computer.

(Searching the Internet some more, I came across a wonderful term, a “dharma-burger”, to describe this combination of Buddhism and pop culture via marketing.)

I am not a Zen teacher, practitioner, or student. However, I have to try to imagine what sort of dialogue I might engage in, were I on a team of engineers who were all white and raised in the West.

Listen, everyone, I don’t think naming this product “Zen” is a good idea. I know that we’re all white here, and when we hear the word “Zen,” we think of a certain minimalistic, natural aesthetic. We definitely want that sort of aesthetic, too. We want our product to feel good and be second-nature to learn.

I don’t think we can use “Zen” as a shorthand to refer to that aesthetic or philosophy, though, because there are a lot of people who have very different associations with the word. The bottom line is that we need to make a decision, now, before we ship, whether we want those people to be among our users or even among our team in the future.

In short, to my mind, it’s needless and offputting baggage. In other words, “Zen arts without Zen study is just cultural junk.”